Sunday, July 24, 2011

Do looks matter?

I found the following on Yahoo on a discussion of five mistakes men make in the dating world.

The first was: Choosing a mate for her looks.

It quoted Ron May, a psychologist in private practice in Madison, Wis., who is on the editorial board for "Psychology Of Men and Masculinity,'' as saying, "What I find is often true with a guy who is dating a beautiful woman is that he starts out by feeling great that he is with this hot person. But then he starts to fear that other men might want her. He becomes jealous, and that can undermine the relationship.''

I think a secure man doesn't feel jealousy.

What are your thoughts. And do women dating good looking guys feel the same way?

Your thoughts?

FD

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Hands

In her blog, Velvet wrote very well about his Master's hands.
Here is the link:

She wrote among other things, "He has held me with them, touching, caressing and hugging me with them, from the moment he came through the door.

"He has gently steered me with them, guiding me to my knees, positioning my own hands, my body, my mouth for his enjoyment.''

You can read the rest on her blog, but it got me to thinking of the thoughts of the women who stop by here have about the hands of the man in their life.

I hope you share you thoughts about his hands and how he uses them when he plays with you.

FD

Monday, July 11, 2011

Belated Birthday

Two years ago last month I started this blog and I want to thank all the readers who have commented on my posts and become followers over the past two years.

First. I have to thank Bonnie of bottomsmarts.blogspot.com, who started her annual Love Our Lurkers Day and convinced me to stop lurking and start commenting. And then PK of elisnewbeginnings.blogspot.com convinced me to start my own blog. As you know, I enjoy posting questions and observations and I appreciate it when so many of you share your thoughts.
I started this blog writing a fictional series called "Lisa's Training." Unfortunately, I haven't updated it in a year, but I still hope to add to it eventually.

And I also want to thank all the other bloggers in our community who keep their blogs going. It is good to hear like minded folks share their experiences.

It's also frustrating when bloggers you feel you know suddenly stop blogging. If you have considered starting your own blog, I want to encourage you to do it. It is very rewarding to get feedback from the readers. And if you are a lurker, feel free to sign up and start commenting.

I hope a year from now I will be able to celebrate the blog's third birthday.

FD

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Breast implants

Saw a blurb in the paper that according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, breast implants in the U.S. increased by 39 per cent in the last decade. And while breast reductions decreased by two per cent, breast lift procedures rose by 70 per cent.

So I thought I'd ask the readers: Have any of you had implants or reductions or have you considered one or the other and what are your views on them?

Your thoughts?

FD

Sunday, July 3, 2011

The Fourth

Well, this is a holiday weekend when we celebrate our independence from our friends on the other side of the pond.

But our independence has been more of a mixed blessing that you might think. Britain abolished slavery in 1833 without a civil war. Of course, they didn't have the cotton economy that we did.

Britain started its NHS -- National Health Insurance -- in 1948. We still don't have it and are at the mercy of the insurance companies and a major illness can leave you bankrupt. The insurance companies demonize NHS by talking about long waits but ask our friends in Great Britain or Canada if they would give it up.

But then are friends across the pond aren't always wiser than we are. They are doing the same austerity thing we are doing and cutting spending when economics 101 is that government should increase spending in times of recession. We are trying to do what Herbert Hoover did and we know how that worked out. In fact FDR was convinced to cut spending in 1937 and that hurt the economy until a federal jobs program called WWII and the subsequent GI bill turned us into a middle class country.

In a Washington Post article called What History teaches us about the welfare state, the author, Francois Furstenberg notes that in 1873 the collapse of Jay Cooke @ Co., the nation's premier investment bank started a financial crisis. It overextended itself by offering risky loans based on overvalued real estate. The government did nothing and for 65 straight months, the economy shrank. It also started an era of labor unrest, including the Homestead stroke of 1892, probably the most violent labor conflict in American history.

The author points out that vast disparities between the rich and poor, the spectacular concentration of wealth amassed by the richest Americans in the two previous generations and the inability of government policies to mitigate the crisis brought the nation to the edge of class warfare and social disintegration.

Of course, now we are in an another era when the gulf between the rich and poor is growing and the answer seems to be more tax cuts for the rich. One blogger on Huffington Post said recently that if you dropped into our country from outer space and listened to the cries for tax cuts for the rich and the cutting of spending on the poor, you would think the problem is that the poor have too much money and the rich don't have enough.

This isn't what I usually write about and you may disagree but I thought I'd add some food for thought as we watch the fireworks on the Fourth of July.

FD